PLAYER ANALYSIS: Andre Gomes and How Opinions Change

If it isn’t a surprise by now, there are many things in football that I have failed to get right since starting this blog. From Brazil or Spain winning the World Cup, Axel Witzel being a bad signing or Seri being one of the best signings of the previous summer. You can always learn from your failings so it is mostly a good thing when I get these predictions wrong. This current player is another who I might have gotten wrong in the past, that being Portugese midfielder Andre Gomes.

When he joined Barcelona for €50m back in 2016, there was a lot of pressure on him to succeed. Champions at the time, Barcelona were still looking at replacing Xavi and finding a worthy successor to Iniesta and even Busquests. Gomes was apart of a Valencia side that was ripped apart by Jorge Mendes’s sharp claws. They went through 3 managers that season, and it was crazy to think any player could come out of that side with a semblance of positivity. It was a crazy summer for Barcelona in 2016. They seemed destined to through money away. Even if you exclude Umtiti, a majority of their signings from that window are not at the club. Alcacer, Digne, Denis Suarez, Cillessen and Gomes all highlight a club that wanted players to just fill the eighteen, instead of truly challenging for first team places. Gomes was the most expensive out of all of these signings, and was arguably the worst. It can all be summed up in Barcelona’s worst defeat that season, their 4-0 defeat to PSG. Gomes started that game, and looked truly out of his depth. He was taken off before the hour mark, and looked like a passenger. He only touched the 39 times, with Iniesta touching it twice as many times. it highlighted a greater problem for Gomes, what does he add to this side? He isn’t as good defensively as Busquets, not as effective in the final third as Iniesta and isn’t nearly as good a passer as Rakitic. For a lot of money, Barcelona got a very average player, and it was clear that he didn’t have a long term future at the Nou Camp.

After another underwhelming follow-up season for Barca, he decided to give the Premier League a go, joining Everton on loan. It strange summer. Everton made a lot of business that seemed good on paper, with Digne and Richarlison being instant hits on Mersyside, while Mina and Zouma haven’t been great been great. Gomes was an important addition to the side. While I’m not a massive fan of his, he does offer much more in a transitional sense than Schneiderlin and Gueye. Both are much better in a defensive sense, and while both are good players, they cannot start them together for a season. They don’t offer enough creatively and in keeping hold of the ball. Gomes was there to add that level of maturity and spark to a midfield full of defensively minded players, and has done that. He’s completing 1.6 dribbles per game, the highest in the side, and completes the most long balls in for any outfield player for the Toffees. His contribution going forward is quite lacklustre, but he has offered very good ball retention and helps Everton begin dominating games. One of his stand out games this season was Everton’s unfortunate draw against their local rivals Liverpool. He added a level of confidence and maturity in a ground where Everton have struggled for a long time. He completed 4 dribbles and made 45 passes, with only Coleman completing more with 52. While he hasn’t been a signing of the season, he’s added an element of class to a side in desperate need of it.

When I titled this post, it wasn’t with the intention of how Gomes turned from a flop into a huge success, it was the fact that I understood him. I mentioned how he was supposed to be the future for Barcelona, but didn’t have an obvious skillset to replace any of their top talent, but moving to a lower side has brought a skillset out of him. Gomes is a good dribbler who can help certain sides retain possession. I would recommend Everton sign him, but for anything less than £30 million. While he has improved them, he hasn’t done enough yet for a side to be ripped off when signing him. Some players just have a certain level where they flourish, and Gomes has found his

Memorable Matches – FC Barcelona 3-1 Manchester United

After the international break becoming baron when discussing relevent football, let’s talk about matches from the past. Games that will never be forgotten in the minds of the fans who watched. Let’s start with a game that I even remember watching at a younger age. The second encounter in two years between Sir Alex’s United, and Pep’s treble winning Barcelona. Both sides previously played each other in the 2009 champions league final, also remembered as Ronaldo’s final game for the club. The game was quite close, but incredible games from both Xavi and Messi put Barcelona over the line. This game was the rematch, which would hopefully see Fergie finally land the victory over Pep. But we all know that is not what happened. So let’s get into it.

United’s great first 10 minutes

Let’s start with by far United’s best moment. Ferguson’s plan was to use both Park and Valencia to deal with the full backs and midfielders. Park would drop deep to stop Alves from making any as advancing runs. Valencia and Park are both incredibly good at tracking back and helping their full backs. It was a classic Ferguson move. He always liked to play players, like Park, in these big games to help nullify the opponent. United played a classic 4-4-2, with Giggs and Carrick in midfield. Their other approach to deal with their midfield disadvantage was to bring one of the wingers inside depending on which side Barcelona were playing. For example, if the ball was on the side of Pedro and Abidal, Valencia would put pressure on them, while Park would come into midfield to limit the effect of Xavi, Iniesta and Busquets. Both Rooney and Hernandez had very important roles. Rooney had to keep on Busquets. The defensive midfielder is so important in how Barcelona build up play. He is one is able to receive the ball and pick out a further advanced player, to help with possession. Rooney at times helped with this (we’ll get to why it didn’t work later) and Hernandez kept pressure on the back two of Pique and Mascherano. This worked so well for the first 10-15 minutes, but we will now get to why this didn’t exactly work.

A Xavi Masterclass

I constantly love to compliment midfielders. Whether it has been my constant defense of Paul Pogba, my praise for Luka Modric, my love for Vidal’s all round excellence, or the many memories I have of Paul Scholes. Xavi is better than all of the above. I fondly remember watching him, and his Barcelona teammates majestically move around the pitch and win 3 international trophies back to back. I do not think there will ever be a better player than Xavi in the middle of the park. His incredible ability at transitioning play, finding space and retaining possession will never be beaten. He was at his mesmerising best in this game. When Busquets was having a limited effect in the first half, Xavi would drop incredibly deep to receive the ball. He would usually then recycle the ball back to the centre halves, until there was space available to advance play. When Xavi dropped this deep, it left Rooney and Hernandez with a difficult decision, either stick with their role, and leave Xavi to retain possession, or try and deal with Xavi, but not full commit to the game plan. It left United chasing the game, because they failed to deal with the change that one player made. Xavi is the one who won the game for Barcelona. His dismantling of United’s plan is the reason why they cruised the game. He was recieving the ball all over the field, and he was just so good at helping Barcelona get the ball in dangerous areas. It was easily one of the best midfield performances you will ever see.

Messi at his best

If Xavi was the captain of the destruction of United’s approach, Messi was the first mate. Messi as a player as evolved dramatically since his long haired teenaged days at the Camp Nou. He began as a right winger, using his pace and dribbling ability to assist Eto’o and Ronaldinho in their dazzling displays in the final third. However Pep saw something else in him, being his ability at finding space. Messi under Pep was easily one of the hardest players to deal with when defending. If the centre backs chose to track him, it would leave space wide open in the back for one of Villa or Pedro to exploit. But if a midfielder chose to track him, it would leave the midfield disjointed. United had this similar problem. It seemed Carrick was the one with the responsibility to deal with Messi. Like the rest of the side, it was fine for the first 10 minutes. Messi didn’t have much of an involvement near the start of the game. But then the Argentine just dropped deeper and deeper, until Carrick couldn’t follow. That was the point where Messi was at his most deadliest. While many will call Messi an excellent dribbler and goal scorer. His best attribute will always be his ability to find space to receive the ball, which would bring the rest of the team into play. There is a reason why Pep told Messi to never receive the ball in the 18 yard box, because he knew exactly how good of a false nine Messi was. Throughout the game you would see Messi drop near enough in his own half, receive the ball, and just run at United. It worked so often and he was untouchable throughout the game. What helped massively was United’s inability to keep up with Barcelona. Their tireless running, aggression and high energy game was really taking its effect as the game went on, by the hour mark, United had zero legs to stand. Barcelona had that much control of the game, that United would never be able to get back into it. Messi and Barcelona were excellent in just waiting for this moment, and really made them suffer.

To conclude, this game was a huge turning point. It was the first time Sir Alex would look at a game and even admit that there was nothing he could do. While their first encounter in Rome was closer in pure ability of the players on the pitch, the rematch was not. United didn’t have the furocious front line of Tevez, Ronaldo and Rooney anymore. Fergie’s magic still brought the best of the aging and average talent throughout the squad, but there was a limit to this. Pep’s team and squad was of such a high standard that any line up Fergie put out on the day, would not have won the game. It was the first time I ever saw Sir Alex get completely outclassed on a tactical level.

It was a high point for his opponent however. This victory ensured that this team of players would go down as one of the best teams to ever play the game (and the best in my opinion). Every player in that team was at their peak, and worked so well together to produce a team that few were ever able to beat. It’s still the team that Pep is trying to equal in achievement and style. A game where the old was beaten by the new, in such a dominant display, and that is why this is a memorable match.